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Superscript and Subscript

Posted By Kevin On February 10, 2011 @ 2:00 PM In MS Office Help,MS Word,OpenOffice | Comments Disabled

Franklyn asks:

When writing email, there are times I would like to use a superscript (degree F) and subscript (H2O). Is there a way to have them available?

Franklyn, if you’re using Microsoft Word or Outlook 2007 or 2010, you can easily add either superscript…

or subscript from the toolbar. In Word, it’s found under the Home tab.

However, in Outlook, this option is found under the Format Text tab.

Or, in any version of Word, from 2003 on, both scripts can also be added by selecting the desired text and using the following keyboard shortcuts.

Superscript-(Ctrl+Shift++)

Subscript-(Ctrl+=)

To return to normal script, just retype the shortcut.

If you don’t have access to Word, superscript and subscript can also be added in OpenOffice Writer, using the keyboard shortcuts below. OpenOffice can be downloaded for free here [1].

Subscript-(Ctrl+Shift+B)

Superscript-(Ctrl+Shift+P)

Again, just retype the shortcut to return to normal script.

These scripts can also be created by using the free word processor, AbiWord, recently reviewed on WorldStart [2]. In AbiWord, they can be found in the Format menu, under Text Formatting.

There are also menu options for these effects in both OpenOffice and Word.

In OpenOffice, in the Format menu, click Character.

In the Character dialog box, under the Position tab, select Superscript, Normal, or Subscript on the left, and make adjustments to size and location on the right.

In Word, select the text to be changed and either click on the arrow in the lower right corner of the Font section..

or right click on the text, and select Font from the list.

Either way, the Font dialog box will appear. Under the Font tab, in the Effects box, select the preferred effect.

As for how to insert it into your email, if you’re not using MS Outlook, I can only offer a limited answer. To test this question, I copied subscript from a Word document into an email sent by Gmail to both Gmail and Thunderbird recipients. Both retained the subscript.

If you’d like to add either of these scripts to an Excel worksheet, take a look at the WorldStart tip here [3] to learn more about it.

~Kevin


Article printed from Worldstart's Tech Tips And Computer Help: http://www.worldstart.com

URL to article: http://www.worldstart.com/superscript-and-subscript/

URLs in this post:

[1] here: http://www.openoffice.org/

[2] recently reviewed on WorldStart: http://www.worldstart.com/abiword-2-8-6/

[3] here: http://www.worldstart.com/subscripts-in-excel/